ADHD seriesAllgemeinPersonal development series

How to make money because you’re bored

Most of the time when we talk about ways to make money, we’re talking about discipline, focus, priorities, connecting to the right network, investment strategies and the likes. And then there’s slightly more inspired material discussing how to tie your passions into prospering, bravery, self-confidence, and playfulness.

But have you ever considered there may be people making money just because there’s nothing else to do? If you are so inclined, you might just make most your money from an obscure private pet project. Here’s fourteen reasons why:

1. There’s no pressure

Since you’re in this project out of curiosity, you don’t need to tackle performance anxiety, criticism or deadlines. While those can make us strive, they cannot compete with the creative excellence of internal motivation. Some create their masterpieces only after giving up on themselves. Assuming nothing is left to lose can make you try something you never dared.

2. You’re the only one working on it, no competition

Since this project stems from some idiosyncratic interest, there will be little competition. For example, there was this one R&D professional who invested two years of their leisure time to compose a deodorant that won’t leave stains. It ended up being their professional legacy. Why? Because: Who does that? Well, only one.

3. You have unique expertise

Once you get into your pet project you will begin to amass unmatched expertise uniquely qualifying you to develop something that perfectly solves a problem. Our deodorant person knew everything about deodorant and stains known to humankind. And they put those insights to good use.

4. There’s no ego involved, you’ll take advice

Since this is not something that you do to impress, it will be easy for you to work with existing solutions and accept advice. Where our pride, politics, career building and competition can get in the way of professional excellence, none of these problems exist with your pet project.

5. You’ll stick to it

You’re likely to stick to this project because it is fun, and it also fits your schedule now. Even if you drop the ball for a while, you will probably come back to it in one way or the other. Creating something unique makes us feel alive.

6. High risk can yield high return

No one would advise making your pet projects your occupation. This would kill all of the above points but be a bad investment of time because these projects are high-risk investments. Don’t assume that your pet project will be profitable. But if it does turn out to be a success it may just yield the highest return you’ve ever had and change your life forever.

7. You may not even notice when it picks off

Sometimes a side gig turns into a financial success before you even notice it. Have you heard these stories about people being put on a career path by their financial advisors? This is the potential, the possibility that someone calls you at the end of the year to say: Hey, are you aware that half your income is now coming from selling guitar picks (true story)?

But have you ever considered there may be people making money just because there’s nothing else to do? If you are so inclined, you may just end up making most your money from some obscure pet project you’ve been keeping to yourself. Here’s why:

8. There’s no pressure

Since this project will likely be something you do out of curiosity, you won’t need to fight performance anxiety, harsh criticism, or deadlines. While all of those can make us strive, they can’t compete with the creative excellence of internal motivation. I know several examples of people creating their masterpieces after giving up on themselves. Assuming nothing was left to loose made them try something they never dared before.

9. You’re the only one working on it, no competition

Since this is likely something stemming from some idiosyncratic point of interest, there will not be a lot of competition. I know a case study where someone invested two years of their free time into composing a deodorant that won’t leave stains. It ended up being their professional legacy in part also because: Who does that? Well. Only one.

10. You have unique expertise

Once you get into your pet project you will soon amass unmatched expertise which uniquely qualifies you to develop something that perfectly solves a problem.

11. There’s no ego involved, you’ll take advice

Since this is not something that you do for your career or to impress in any way, it will be easy for you to work with existing solutions and accept advice. Where our pride, politics, career building and competition can get in the way of our professional excellence, none of these problems exist with your pet project.

12. You’ll stick to it

You’re especially likely to stick to this project because it is fun, and it also fits into your schedule at the moment. Even if you drop the ball for a while, you will probably come back to it in one way or the other.

13. High risk can yield high return

No one would advise to make your pet projects your occupation prematurely, partly because it would kill all of the above but also because these projects would be considered high-risk investments. It doesn’t make a lot of sense to assume that your pet project will be profitable. But if it does turn out to be a success it may just yield the highest return you’ve ever had and change your life forever.

14. You may not even notice when it picks off

Sometimes a side gig turns into a financial success before you even notice it. Have you heard these stories about people being put on a career path by their financial advisors? This happens only with side gigs, where someone may just call you at the end of the year and say: Hey, are you aware that half your income is now coming from selling guitar picks (true story)?

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.